Conservation Almanac

Almanac

:

New York

New York Profile of State Programs and Policy Framework

Highlighted Local Programs

New York

Highlighted State Programs

New York

State Policy Framework

New York

Disclaimer

To avoid double counting acres where multiple programs contributed to the acquisition of a single parcel, the acreage is only aggregated under the program that provided the majority of funding. For example, if the table below displays a dollar amount greater than $0 for a given year but shows 0 acres, the program was not the primary contributor for any parcels in that year. As a result, a prolific program may show very low acreage figures on this page. To see customized program information please visit the map viewer tab or contact the Conservation Almanac Team.

Highlighted Local Programs

Local Conservation Programs Include:

    Dutchess County, NY

    Nassau County, NY

    Suffolk County, NY

    Westchester County, NY




Visit
LandVote.org for detailed information on these programs.





In addition, New York City conducts its own independent land acquisition program. The New York City Land Acquisition Program (LAP) is managed by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection- Bureau of Water Supply and is part of the City's comprehensive effort to protect the quality of its water supply. The program was established in 1997 by the historic New York City Watershed Memorandum of Understanding that was signed by New York City, New York State, EPA, environmental groups, and counties and municipalities in the watershed. The Land Acquisition Program targets priority areas in the watershed area, which encompasses Greene, Delaware, Dutchess, Schoharie, Sullivan, Ulster, Putnam, and Westchester Counties. New York City pays full fair market value to acquire land through fee simple purchase or conservation easements. Lands are acquired from willing sellers only. Funding for land acquisition to protect the watershed comes from rate-payers for water and sewer, mainly from within the five boroughs of New York City. The City also partners with the Watershed Agricultural Council, providing funding to support acquisition of conservation easements on operating farms in the watershed, provided that the agricultural use also protects water quality. Comprehensive, parcel level data for this program is currently not included in the Conservation Almanac. As of December 2014, the program has protected 1,495 parcels to protect 128,393 acres at a cost of $449.13 million. In 2011, New York State issued the City a permit to continue the program for an additional 15 years.

YearAcresDollars
2011 198.4 $20,726,585
2010 4.3 $4,758,106
2009 483.3 $62,429,058
2008 783.2 $122,467,298
2007 2,618.3 $285,337,554
2006 2,303.6 $122,070,261
2005 2,271.6 $99,418,461
2004 1,607.7 $103,417,247
2003 977.4 $70,899,645
2002 637.3 $50,359,228
2001 1,305.3 $82,019,643
2000 763.1 $41,903,224
1999 102.0 $8,643,768
1998 131.7 $2,458,000
Totals 14,187.2 $1,076,908,084

Highlighted State Programs

New York Environmental Protection Fund

The New York State Environmental Protection Fund (EPF) was created in 1993 and relies primarily on revenue from the real estate transfer tax to fund to the purchase of land for conservation and recreation. A smaller source of funding comes from the sale of New York State Bluebird license plates. Revenue from the fund is distributed to the Department of Environmental Conservation, the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, as well as to local governments and not-for-profits. Funding for EPF, which finances land conservation and other environmental programs, was supposed to reach $300 million according to legislation in 2011, however it dropped from $222 million in 2009 to $134 million in 2010, 2011, and 2012. The Governor and state legislature maintained funding at $134 million in the 2012-2013 state budget. The 2016-17 budget included $300 million for EPF.

Below are descriptions of the programs supported by EPF.

Environmental Protection Fund - Farmland Protection Program
Environmental Protection Fund - Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
Environmental Protection Fund - Department of Environmental Conservation

YearAcresDollars
2011 4,221.6 $17,204,308
2010 90,233.9 $48,158,894
2009 1,982.7 $7,426,572
2008 124,750.7 $83,883,813
2007 77,105.6 $67,447,723
2006 28,062.4 $59,461,203
2005 18,157.8 $53,352,044
2004 12,635.4 $47,297,661
2003 10,262.4 $23,389,627
2002 13,147.7 $21,622,562
2001 1,959.1 $22,097,464
2000 8,382.6 $69,024,763
1999 27,858.2 $25,492,828
1998 23,915.2 $55,539,965
Total442,675.1 $601,399,433

New York Environmental Protection Fund - Farmland Protection Program

The Department of Agriculture & Markets administers the Farmland Protection Program.* There are two matching grant programs focused on farmland protection. The first program was designed to assist county governments in developing agricultural and farmland protection plans. The second program, Farmland Protection Implementation Grants (FPIG), was set up to assist local governments implement local farmland protection plans by purchasing the development rights. Funding is made available through Environmental Protection Fund to cover up to 50 percent of the costs for counties to develop agricultural and farmland protection plans, and up to 75 percent of the costs for the purchase of development rights (PDR) on farms.

Under the Departmentís FPIG program (which uses EPF monies), the resulting conservation easements are held by either a local government or a land trust or are co-held by both. While the program has co-funded a few projects with federal Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program money, in no case is the Federal Government an easement holder (or co-holder) for a project that has received FPIG monies from the EPF.

New York Environmental Protection Fund - Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation

The Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation uses the state's Environmental Protection Fund for park acquisitions. Until recently, park acquisitions were also made using bond funds approved by voters in 1996.

New York Environmental Protection Fund - Department of Environmental Conservation

The Department of Environmental Conservation administers the Environmental Protection Fund, which was passed in 1993. The Department of Environmental Conservation uses its portion of EFP funding to acquire land to be included in the Forest Preserve, State Nature and Historical Preserve, State Historic Site, Unique Areas as well as other categories. Funding for projects must reflect priorities established in the New York State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation – Non EPF

In addition to Environmental Protection Fund, the Department of Environmental Conservation used 1996 voter approved bond money for several years

YearAcresDollars
2011 1,910.6 $83,800
2010 8,738.0 $5,043,800
2009 48.0 $47,600
2008 513.7 $17,521,700
2007 47.5 $186,659
2006 248.7 $69,800
2005 324.4 $2,781,100
2004 108.6 $72,100
2003 833.4 $509,058
2002 231.0 $8,102,464
2001 6,370.7 $7,119,283
2000 3,023.5 $8,898,605
1999 9,674.4 $38,543,235
1998 1,480.6 $11,758,271
Total33,553.1 $100,737,477

New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation – Non EPF

In addition to Environmental Protection Fund, the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation used 1996 voter approved bond money for several years

YearAcresDollars
2011 24.9 $381,000
2007 187.6 $483,000
2002 452.1 $366,400
2001 427.2 $519,747
2000 831.7 $9,613,333
1999 1,065.6 $11,504,112
1998 4,847.6 $8,643,265
Total7,836.7 $31,510,857

New York Port Authority of New York and New Jersey - Hudson-Raritan Estuary Resources Program


The Hudson-Raritan Estuary Resources Program (HREP) is designed to help balance redevelopment plans of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey with the need to preserve critical habitats and public waterfront access in the two states. The program funds protection of critical habitat within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. Sites considered are identified as threatened by development and suitable for conservation, ecological enhancement, public waterfront access, and/or environmental mitigation.

The program is funded with appropriations made by the Port Authorityís Board of Commissioners. In July 2001, the board set aside $60 million ($30 million each for New York and New Jersey). An additional $10 million was authorized in 2004 for acquisitions and improvement within the Meadowlands District in New Jersey. The Board approved a second $60 million investment in February 2014 to again be split by New York and New Jersey. So far 400 acres have been preserved, including 150 in New York.

YearAcresDollars
2011 0.6 $1,200,000
2009 1.1 $1,925,000
2008 0.7 $950,000
2006 75.0 $12,500,000
2005 3.6 $176,610
2004 0.3 $285,000
2003 9.7 $2,999,000
Total91.0 $20,035,610

New York Clean Water State Revolving Fund

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) is authorized to finance eligible projects in accordance with the Clean Water Act. Acquiring or preserving land, as open space for water quality purposes is one such type of eligible project. Allowable costs may include the cost of land purchases or conservation easements (based on fair market value), property appraisals, surveys, site assessments, title searches, and other related costs.

Any municipality or qualified not-for-profit organization, which is authorized to acquire land for water quality protection purposes under Article 49 of the NYS Environmental Conservation Law may apply for CWSRF financing loans for land acquisition to protect water quality.

Spending data for this program, as well as other loan programs, is not included in the Conservation Almanac. Between 1998 and 2008, the program provided more than $328.9 million in loans for land acquisition projects.

*Article 25-AAA of the Agriculture and Markets Law

YearAcresDollars
2008 2.1 $0
2007 7.3 $0
2006 0.0 $0
2005 19.0 $0
2004 1,097.2 $0
2003 21,239.8 $0
2002 11,270.8 $0
2001 11,125.2 $0
2000 11,270.5 $0
1999 0.0 $0
1998 1.5 $0
Total56,033.4 $0

State Policy Framework

Substantial State Investment

Enable Local Financing

State Incentive for Local Land Conservation

Public-Private Partnerships

Conservation Tax Credits

Federal Partnerships

Some data was not provided on a yearly basis, but rather as an aggregate figure. In this case we have distributed total acres acquired and/or dollars spent evenly by year.