Conservation Almanac

Almanac

:

Illinois

Illinois Profile of State Programs and Policy Framework

Highlighted Local Programs

Illinois

Highlighted State Programs

Illinois

State Policy Framework

Illinois

Disclaimer

To avoid double counting acres where multiple programs contributed to the acquisition of a single parcel, the acreage is only aggregated under the program that provided the majority of funding. For example, if the table below displays a dollar amount greater than $0 for a given year but shows 0 acres, the program was not the primary contributor for any parcels in that year. As a result, a prolific program may show very low acreage figures on this page. To see customized program information please visit the map viewer tab or contact the Conservation Almanac Team.

Highlighted Local Programs

Local Conservation Programs Include:

    DeKalb County Forest Preserve District, IL

    DuPage County Forest Preserve District, IL

    Kane County Forest Preserve District, IL

    Kendall County Forest Preserve District, IL

    Lake County Forest Preserve District, IL

    McHenry County Conservation District, IL

    Will County Forest Preserve District, IL




Visit
LandVote.org for detailed information on these programs.

YearAcresDollars
2012 272.9 $3,850,420
2011 981.2 $20,113,196
2010 3,003.3 $101,301,763
2009 1,923.4 $118,289,814
2008 4,082.3 $135,553,311
2007 3,133.5 $125,127,407
2006 5,612.3 $126,755,312
2005 1,078.5 $13,488,372
2004 3,030.7 $40,255,490
2003 5,552.3 $89,465,046
2002 5,219.0 $67,554,679
2001 5,768.6 $86,653,678
2000 6,475.4 $129,090,676
1999 1,934.4 $21,705,669
1998 1,637.5 $30,336,262
Totals 49,705.4 $1,109,541,105

Highlighted State Programs

Illinois Open Space Lands Acquisition and Development Program

Begun in 1986, Open Space Lands Acquisition and Development (OSLAD) focuses on providing basic, local outdoor recreation opportunities, including land for parks and facilities such as ball fields and playgrounds. The program matches funds provided by park districts, municipalities, forest preserve districts and other local government entities, providing up to 50 percent of the funding. Grant awards up to $750,000 are available for acquisition projects (grant award maximum in Chicago is $1.15 million), while development/renovation projects are limited to a $400,000 grant maximum. OSLAD funding is provided through the state real estate transfer tax, and is managed by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

YearAcresDollars
2012 0.0 $623,350
2011 5.3 $168,500
2010 215.7 $4,996,400
2009 180.0 $3,838,100
2008 0.0 $5,841,050
2007 75.2 $7,560,666
2006 113.8 $9,308,400
2005 0.0 $1,455,500
2004 40.0 $2,681,300
2003 5.2 $1,821,800
2002 11.3 $1,570,450
2001 2.3 $5,536,190
2000 136.2 $5,967,800
1999 29.9 $4,267,200
1998 1.9 $3,350,600
Total816.7 $58,987,306

lllinois Natural Areas Acquisition Fund

The Natural Areas Acquisition Fund (NAAF) was created by the General Assembly in 1989 for “the acquisition, preservation and stewardship of natural areas, including habitat for endangered and threatened species, high quality natural communities, wetlands and other areas with unique or unusual natural heritage qualities.” NAAF also includes a stewardship component: 10 percent of the land acquisition fund is set aside each year to pay for stewardship projects on natural areas and nature preserves, including exotic species removal, prescribed burning in the prairies and hydrologic restoration in wetlands and streams. Funding is provided through the state real estate transfer tax and is managed by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Since 1998, NAAF provided $47.4 million in funding to acquire 15,321 acres of high quality natural habitat. Between 2010 and 2014, less than $1 million total has been spent on land acquisition. This stems from both fluctuating real estate transfer tax revenues and government decisions that have redirected NAAF funds for operational support and staffing.

YearAcresDollars
2013 43.3 $43,000
2011 39.4 $140,000
2010 302.5 $454,500
2009 814.3 $4,115,058
2008 516.8 $5,302,699
2007 692.6 $3,315,803
2006 3,306.1 $13,560,981
2005 430.4 $1,230,174
2004 548.0 $937,188
2003 1,266.0 $2,883,504
2002 3,752.1 $5,207,448
2001 1,539.9 $3,838,584
2000 485.8 $1,195,308
1999 1,393.1 $4,418,801
1998 257.2 $743,038
Total15,387.5 $47,386,090

Illinois Conservation 2000

In 1995, the state legislature passed Conservation 2000 (C2000), a program designed to promote ecosystem-based management of privately held land in a public-private partnership. The C2000 Program funds nine programs across three state agencies in Illinois - the Department of Natural Resources, the Department of Agriculture, and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency. C2000 devotes most of its funding to planning and management activities, but a portion of its funds go towards land acquisition. C2000 also invests in conservation easements and other mechanisms to help protect privately held land with high quality habitat. The C2000 program sponsors 41 Ecosystem Partnerships—coalitions of local stakeholders such as private landowners, businesses, scientists, environmental organizations, recreational enthusiasts and policy makers—covering 85 percent of Illinois.*

C2000 was originally a six-year, $100 million program, but in 2008, House Bill 1780 was signed into law as Public Act 95-0139, extending the program to 2021, and calling it Partners for Conservation. This program no longer actively acquires land.

YearAcresDollars
2008 178.5 $448,348
2007 74.9 $496,000
2006 245.7 $244,558
2005 604.9 $914,206
2004 604.9 $1,202,180
2003 852.0 $1,803,514
2002 1,246.6 $767,741
2001 343.7 $671,985
2000 940.4 $1,190,600
1999 217.4 $503,120
Total5,308.9 $8,242,253

Illinois Department of Natural Resources - Open Land Trust

The Open Lands Trust (OLT) funds the acquisition of land from willing sellers for public conservation, open space, and natural resource related outdoor recreation purposes. Funding was previously split between matching grants for local governments and direct acquisitions by the Illinois Department of Natural resources. Created in 1998, 94 percent of OLT spending occurred from its first funding authorization of $200 million by the General Assembly. OLT funded $135.7 million to acquire over 42,000 acres between 1998 and 2003, and just $8.6 million to acquire nearly 1,931 acres from 2004 to 2013. In 2009, OLT received a $25 million appropriation for new land acquisitions. As of 2014, those funds are not yet fully expended.

YearAcresDollars
2013 715.4 $2,947,296
2012 547.9 $2,884,500
2007 0.0 $1,000,000
2006 259.0 $1,268,500
2005 217.5 $744,763
2004 10.0 $2,014,680
2003 7,217.1 $31,667,692
2002 6,841.3 $32,754,321
2001 18,112.0 $40,780,096
2000 7,504.6 $21,721,455
1999 1,662.0 $7,000,000
1998 131.5 $60,006
Total43,218.2 $144,843,310

Park and Recreational Facility Construction Grant Program (PARC)

Established in 2009, this program provides funding for local governments pursue projects including acquisition, development, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, and improvements to buildings, structures, and lands for park and recreation purposes, as well as for open space and natural areas. The program provides significant matching grants to local governments of up to 75 percent for bondable projects. The maximum grant per project is $2.5 million. The program was established with $150 million in total appropriations and is now largely exhausted.

State Policy Framework

Substantial State Investment

Enable Local Financing

State Incentive for Local Land Conservation

Public-Private Partnerships

Conservation Tax Credits

Federal Partnerships

Some data was not provided on a yearly basis, but rather as an aggregate figure. In this case we have distributed total acres acquired and/or dollars spent evenly by year.