Conservation Almanac

Almanac

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Indiana

Indiana Profile of State Programs and Policy Framework

Highlighted Local Programs

Indiana

Highlighted State Programs

Indiana

State Policy Framework

Indiana

Disclaimer

To avoid double counting acres where multiple programs contributed to the acquisition of a single parcel, the acreage is only aggregated under the program that provided the majority of funding. For example, if the table below displays a dollar amount greater than $0 for a given year but shows 0 acres, the program was not the primary contributor for any parcels in that year. As a result, a prolific program may show very low acreage figures on this page. To see customized program information please visit the map viewer tab or contact the Conservation Almanac Team.

Highlighted Local Programs

No local conservation finance measures have been approved by voters in Indiana. For more information, visit LandVote.org.

Highlighted State Programs

Indiana Department of Natural Resources

The Department of Natural Resources uses several revenue streams for land acquisition including: Natural Resources Damage Settlement money, state tax check-off donations, and public-access site money.

The largest source of funding for land conservation in Indiana is the Indiana Heritage Trust. The Indiana Natural Heritage Protection Act was passed in 1983 and was funded by a $5 million one-time general fund appropriation. The Indiana Heritage Trust was created almost a decade later in 1992, and is administered by the Department of Natural Resources. Funds are generated through the sale of environmental license plates, general assembly appropriations, and donations.

In addition to the Indiana Heritage Trust, the Bicentennial Nature Trust was created in 2012 to preserve and protect important conservation and recreation areas in Indiana. The state obligated $20 million in state funding to support the Bicentennial Nature Trust and the Lilly Endowment contributed a $10 million grant. A 1:1 match is required from foundations, local non-profit or philanthropic organizations, private donors, or bargain sales. Funds can only be used for land acquisition; capital improvements, stewardship, and programming are excluded uses of the funds.

YearAcresDollars
2011 446.6 $748,177
2010 1,621.2 $756,956
2009 1,669.1 $2,740,366
2008 1,715.8 $1,240,062
2007 1,195.2 $1,363,809
2006 3,068.3 $2,528,210
2005 10,089.7 $8,405,704
2004 677.4 $469,513
2003 995.3 $1,585,562
2002 1,811.2 $2,594,884
2001 3,228.7 $3,908,567
2000 1,849.4 $2,895,743
1999 535.9 $479,030
1998 2,970.2 $1,814,186
Total31,874.0 $31,530,773

Indiana Stream and Wetland Mitigation Program

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources is currently developing the Indiana Stream and Wetland Mitigation Program, an in-lieu fee program that will provide stream and wetland mitigation credits that can be used for compensatory mitigation for unavoidable impacts to select waters and wetlands.

While the program is still being developed and is subject to approval by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and an interagency review team, it is likely to include both fee simple acquisitions and conservation easements. Projects will acquire, restore or protect aquatic resources. The program is expected to open in 2016 and will be managed by Indiana Department of Natural Resources and Indiana Natural Resources Foundation, a not-for-profit organization created by the Indiana General Assembly to promote, support, assist, and sustain the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.
The permittee will provide funds to an in-lieu fee sponsor, which must be a public agency or non-profit natural resource organization. Indiana Department of Natural Resources anticipates partnering with non-profit organizations, land trust, park departments and other groups on potential projects.

State Policy Framework

Substantial State Investment

Enable Local Financing

State Incentive for Local Land Conservation

Public-Private Partnerships

Conservation Tax Credits

Federal Partnerships

Some data was not provided on a yearly basis, but rather as an aggregate figure. In this case we have distributed total acres acquired and/or dollars spent evenly by year.