Conservation Almanac

Almanac

:

Ohio

Ohio Profile of State Programs and Policy Framework

Highlighted Local Programs

Ohio

Highlighted State Programs

Ohio

State Policy Framework

Ohio

Disclaimer

To avoid double counting acres where multiple programs contributed to the acquisition of a single parcel, the acreage is only aggregated under the program that provided the majority of funding. For example, if the table below displays a dollar amount greater than $0 for a given year but shows 0 acres, the program was not the primary contributor for any parcels in that year. As a result, a prolific program may show very low acreage figures on this page. To see customized program information please visit the map viewer tab or contact the Conservation Almanac Team.

Highlighted Local Programs

Local Conservation Programs Include:

    Cleveland, OH

    Cleveland Metro Park District, OH

    Columbus, OH

    Columbus & Franklin County Metro Park District, OH

    Five Rivers Metro Park District, OH

    Geauga County Park District, OH

    Medina County Park District, OH

    Lake County Metro Park District, OH




Visit
LandVote.org for detailed information on these programs.

YearAcresDollars
2011 379.1 $3,214,595
2010 935.8 $18,468,825
2009 767.4 $12,636,250
2008 2,494.8 $16,206,270
2007 685.2 $11,226,538
2006 1,494.0 $19,371,304
2005 642.0 $8,722,969
2004 2,096.0 $22,896,022
2003 1,523.8 $15,965,572
2002 917.2 $6,456,040
2001 1,232.0 $7,414,557
2000 1,554.0 $12,782,523
1999 1,287.6 $12,862,028
1998 906.4 $1,901,689
Totals 16,915.0 $170,125,189

Highlighted State Programs

Clean Ohio Fund

In November 2000, Ohio voters passed a four-year, $200 million statewide bond measure for “Brownfield” environmental clean up projects and “Greenfield” conservation and open space projects. The Fund is divided into four sub-programs: Brownfield Revitalization, Clean Ohio Conservation Program, Farmland Preservation, and Recreational Trails. Of these, only the Clean Ohio Conservation and Farmland Preservation programs use funds primarily for land acquisition. Applicants for the bond funds may be local governments or non-profit entities and must provide a 25 percent local funding match, which can be in-kind services.*

In 2008 voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot initiative that provides another $200 million towards the Clean Ohio Fund.

Since 2009 the Ohio legislature and Governor have cut funding for these programs despite voter authorization. A coalition is working to restore funding for Clean Ohio and in May 2012 the Governor signed HB 487, which included $36 million for the Green Space Conservation Program and $6 million for the Agricultural Easement Purchase Program and Brownfield revitalization.

SEE INDIVIDUAL SUB-PROGRAMS (BELOW) FOR DETAIL ON YEAR BY YEAR ACQUISITIONS.

Clean Ohio Fund - Greenspace

The Clean Ohio Fund is divided into four sub-programs: Brownfield Revitalization, Clean Ohio Conservation Program, Farmland Preservation, and Recreational Trails. Of these, only the Clean Ohio Conservation and Farmland Preservation programs use funds primarily for land acquisition. Applicants for the bond funds may be local governments or non-profit entities and must provide a 25 percent local funding match, which can be in-kind services.*

YearAcresDollars
2011 1,960.2 $6,097,142
2010 6,478.6 $30,764,019
2009 2,904.7 $22,083,558
2008 2,230.3 $11,252,461
2007 8,170.6 $29,653,736
2006 3,366.6 $18,765,572
2005 4,205.6 $17,400,590
2004 3,148.6 $15,676,603
2003 6,368.8 $28,768,094
2002 5,019.7 $13,351,286
Total43,853.6 $193,813,061

Clean Ohio Fund - Trails

The Clean Ohio Fund is divided into four sub-programs: Brownfield Revitalization, Clean Ohio Conservation Program, Farmland Preservation, and Recreational Trails. The Recreation Trails program spends little on new trail acquisition. Its primary focus is on maintenance and restoration. Applicants for the bond funds may be local governments or non-profit entities and must provide a 25 percent local funding match, which can be in-kind services.*

YearAcresDollars
2011 530.3 $1,257,795
2009 2.2 $95,500
Total532.5 $1,353,295

Clean Ohio Fund - Farmland

The Clean Ohio Fund is divided into four sub-programs: Brownfield Revitalization, Clean Ohio Conservation Program, Farmland Preservation, and Recreational Trails. Of these, only the Clean Ohio Conservation and Farmland Preservation programs use funds primarily for land acquisition. Applicants for the bond funds may be local governments or non-profit entities and must provide a 25 percent local funding match, which can be in-kind services.*

YearAcresDollars
2011 9,206.6 $9,356,121
2010 2,105.5 $2,032,236
2009 3,949.3 $3,957,334
2008 469.8 $678,376
2007 6,659.5 $5,486,090
2006 4,770.9 $4,823,253
2005 2,641.1 $3,109,770
2004 3,113.2 $5,239,441
2003 4,503.3 $8,618,789
Total37,419.2 $43,301,410

Ohio Department of Natural Resources

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) uses several different sources of revenue to fund land acquisition. In 1984, a tax check-off was established to supply funds for the Natural Areas and Preserves Fund, which is administered by the ODNR.** The statute designates that funds may only be used for land acquisition, facility development, special projects related to natural areas, nature preserves, and wild, scenic, and recreational river areas as well as routine maintenance.

In addition, ODNR has four license plate programs that generate revenue for land conservation. These consist of the sportsman’s plates, the conservation plates, Ohio scenic river plate, and Ohio state park plate. Proceeds from the conservation plate go to the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund for management, and the acquisition of title and easements to lands, among other purposes.*** Each program supports projects that help acquire land for conservation, wildlife, or water quality.


YearAcresDollars
2011 198.4 $570,500
2010 7,403.4 $6,463,816
2009 4,387.3 $2,982,652
2008 111.9 $8,827,903
2007 6,772.9 $6,660,683
2006 16,507.0 $13,571,174
2005 608.7 $1,581,119
2004 2,774.3 $5,242,255
2003 6,211.0 $5,360,967
2002 1,314.2 $3,368,643
2001 2,958.9 $6,023,462
2000 4,690.7 $9,402,807
1999 1,985.3 $4,386,098
1998 1,941.6 $1,468,170
Total57,865.7 $75,910,253

Ohio Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program

Established in 1989, the Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) is a revolving fund meant to provide low interest loans in perpetuity to finance publicly owned wastewater treatment works to reduce pollution.**** Since then, many water quality problems have been addressed and efforts have now begun to target non-point source pollution that threatens water resources. Consequently, the Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP) was established to provide WPCLF funding recipients the opportunity to finance land acquisition for projects that address non-point source pollution. Activities may range from land conservation to intensive restoration and recovery of stream and aquatic habitats. WRRSP uses funds generated through interest payments on the WPCLF loan. Since the programs inception in 2000, approximately 90 percent of funding was used for land acquisition.

*House Bill No 3 - 2001
**Ohio Revised Code Title 15 Chapter 1517 §5747.113 (http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/1517.11)
***Ohio Revised Code Title 15 Chapter 1531.23 §4503.57 (http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/1531.26)
****Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program website (http://www.epa.state.oh.us/pic/wrrsp/html/wrrsp.html)

YearAcresDollars
2011 0.0 $7,313,040
2010 0.0 $10,898,675
2009 0.0 $20,984,502
2008 0.0 $16,468,285
2007 65.0 $3,989,472
2006 0.0 $16,835,776
2005 201.0 $15,520,712
2004 112.8 $18,325,961
2003 84.5 $17,785,000
2002 0.0 $7,090,800
2001 115.6 $19,054,400
2000 0.0 $672,000
Total578.9 $154,938,626

State Policy Framework

Substantial State Investment

Enable Local Financing

State Incentive for Local Land Conservation

Public-Private Partnerships

Conservation Tax Credits

Federal Partnerships

Some data was not provided on a yearly basis, but rather as an aggregate figure. In this case we have distributed total acres acquired and/or dollars spent evenly by year.