Conservation Almanac

Almanac

:

Colorado

Colorado Profile of State Programs and Policy Framework

Highlighted Local Programs

Colorado

Highlighted State Programs

Colorado

State Policy Framework

Colorado

Disclaimer

To avoid double counting acres where multiple programs contributed to the acquisition of a single parcel, the acreage is only aggregated under the program that provided the majority of funding. For example, if the table below displays a dollar amount greater than $0 for a given year but shows 0 acres, the program was not the primary contributor for any parcels in that year. As a result, a prolific program may show very low acreage figures on this page. To see customized program information please visit the map viewer tab or contact the Conservation Almanac Team.

Highlighted Local Programs

Local Conservation Programs Include:

    Adams County, CO

    Arapahoe County, CO

    Boulder County, CO

    Broomfield County, CO

    Clear Creek County, CO

    Colorado Springs, CO

    Denver County, CO

    Douglas County, CO

    Eagle County, CO

    Fort Collins, CO

    Gunnison County, CO

    Jefferson County, CO

    Larimer County, CO

    Longmont, CO

    Park County, CO

    Pitkin County, CO

    Routt County, CO

    San Miguel County, CO

    Summit County, CO

    Westminster, CO




Visit
LandVote.org for detailed information on these programs.

YearAcresDollars
2015 3,236.1 $37,117,717
2014 1,829.9 $19,576,832
2013 3,801.6 $45,360,445
2012 1,716.8 $33,718,197
2011 9,188.0 $77,909,513
2010 9,715.0 $74,905,223
2009 4,752.7 $51,072,603
2008 5,915.0 $43,902,522
2007 17,604.9 $86,187,720
2006 9,869.4 $50,549,814
2005 8,304.3 $72,958,334
2004 30,253.7 $70,431,839
2003 16,870.6 $96,892,224
2002 8,892.7 $70,523,918
2001 11,709.0 $95,502,150
2000 12,517.3 $90,898,261
1999 20,220.2 $110,974,441
1998 6,362.1 $32,130,280
Totals 182,759.1 $1,160,612,039

Highlighted State Programs

Great Outdoors Colorado

In 1992, Colorado voters approved the Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) Amendment to the State Constitution. This amendment created the GOCO Trust Fund, which earmarked a portion of lottery proceeds for land conservation. The Great Outdoors Colorado program first awarded grants in 1994. The Colorado constitution requires that lottery proceeds be substantially equal over time in the distribution to the following areas:

• Wildlife resources through the Division of Wildlife
• Investments in outdoor recreation through Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation
• Competitive grants to the Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation and Division of Wildlife, counties, municipalities, or non-profit land conservation organizations “to identify acquire and manage open space and natural areas of statewide significance”
• Competitive matching grants (25 to 50 percent requirement) to local governments and nonprofit land conservation organizations in order to acquire, develop, or manage open lands and parks.

From these funding categories, GOCO has developed several grant programs, including
• Local government grants (LPOR) for community parks, trails and recreation facilities
• Open space grants for conservation easements or acquisition of land for preservation
• Annual investments in Colorado Parks and Wildlife for non-game species management, habitat, youth education, facilities improvements, staffing, operations, and environmental education

YearAcresDollars
2015 4,489.0 $8,582,693
2014 51,053.7 $14,415,604
2013 3,651.8 $16,028,222
2012 33,259.3 $23,492,497
2011 40,956.1 $36,569,870
2010 63,851.6 $26,486,319
2009 10,401.0 $24,061,069
2008 37,824.8 $28,789,400
2007 20,380.6 $20,448,339
2006 8,917.4 $15,769,455
2005 33,655.8 $18,312,612
2004 23,256.3 $31,954,682
2003 2,831.2 $24,097,501
2002 2,949.9 $16,222,628
2001 1,160.0 $10,936,192
2000 16,287.0 $22,633,253
1999 19,082.7 $33,376,984
1998 5,326.0 $10,463,716
Total379,334.0 $382,641,041

Colorado Parks and Wildlife

As of 2011, Colorado State Parks and the Division of Wildlife merged to form the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission (CPW). CPW’s mission is to perpetuate the wildlife resources of the state, provide a quality state parks system, and provide enjoyable and sustainable outdoor recreation opportunities that educate and inspire current and future generations. The agency manages 42 state parks and more than 300 state wildlife areas. CPW manages hunting and fishing licenses, manages wildlife, protects habitat, and administers the state’s trail program, among a host of other activities.

CPW’s revenues are derived from 50 percent licenses, passes, fees, and permits, 18 percent federal and state grants and loans, 17 percent lottery and GOCO, 7 percent sales, donations, interest, and other revenues, 4 percent registrations, and 4 percent severance tax and general fund.


YearAcresDollars
2015 4,990.0 $1,850,000
2014 0.0 $2,404,540
2013 2,746.0 $1,646,050
2012 19,361.0 $3,374,130
2011 4,942.0 $4,455,266
2010 2,524.0 $4,336,533
2009 3,297.0 $1,850,000
Total37,860.0 $19,916,519

Former Colorado State Parks

Colorado State Parks range from urban parks to backcountry retreats and from natural areas to recreational trails. Funding was largely from the State Lottery, GOCO, park passes, fees, and internal funds. Colorado State Parks maintained a number of programs ranging from Boating, Snowmobile and OHV activity, Volunteering, Trails, Natural Areas Preservation and Resource Stewardship.

YearAcresDollars
2011 58.0 $203,358
2010 0.4 $6,000
2009 295.5 $3,305,077
2008 8.3 $545,500
2007 1,004.2 $2,394,000
2006 477.0 $4,965,300
2005 245.0 $2,855,000
2004 461.9 $3,729,305
2003 17.0 $751,828
2002 175.0 $2,291,256
2001 63.0 $252,300
2000 471.0 $9,478,546
1999 2,404.0 $13,336,457
1998 1,634.0 $3,767,022
Total7,314.4 $47,880,950

Former Colorado Division of Wildlife

The Colorado Division of Wildlife provided habitat for wildlife as well as recreational destinations for hunters, anglers and the public. The Division of Wildlife received funding from license fees, Colorado’s share of federal taxes on hunting and fishing equipment (Federal Aid), Great Outdoors Colorado lottery grants, and interest on fund balances.

YearAcresDollars
2011 0.0 $765,175
2010 80.0 $1,138,500
2009 1,851.0 $4,910,911
2008 13,810.0 $7,659,587
2007 1,560.0 $6,536,138
2006 2,050.0 $1,096,250
2005 335.0 $1,760,086
2004 1,815.0 $3,039,827
2003 3,376.0 $259,525
2002 39,457.0 $13,908,468
2001 12,908.0 $4,102,602
2000 176.0 $103,107
1999 5,729.0 $1,857,830
1998 6,959.0 $2,075,106
Total90,106.0 $49,213,112

State Policy Framework

Substantial State Investment

Enable Local Financing

State Incentive for Local Land Conservation

Public-Private Partnerships

Conservation Tax Credits

Federal Partnerships

Some data was not provided on a yearly basis, but rather as an aggregate figure. In this case we have distributed total acres acquired and/or dollars spent evenly by year.