Conservation Almanac

Almanac

:

Tennessee

Tennessee Profile of State Programs and Policy Framework

Highlighted Local Programs

Tennessee

Highlighted State Programs

Tennessee

State Policy Framework

Tennessee

Disclaimer

To avoid double counting acres where multiple programs contributed to the acquisition of a single parcel, the acreage is only aggregated under the program that provided the majority of funding. For example, if the table below displays a dollar amount greater than $0 for a given year but shows 0 acres, the program was not the primary contributor for any parcels in that year. As a result, a prolific program may show very low acreage figures on this page. To see customized program information please visit the map viewer tab or contact the Conservation Almanac Team.

Highlighted Local Programs

No county-level conservation finance measures have been approved by voters in Tennessee. For more information on municipal measures in the state, visit LandVote.org

YearAcresDollars
2013 0.0 $40,962
2012 479.0 $300,000
2011 2.0 $142,539
2010 3.2 $11,500
2009 8.0 $1,099,574
2008 30.0 $200,000
2007 128.8 $3,680,000
2006 30.8 $114,000
2004 72.2 $774,000
2003 97.4 $280,700
2002 28.6 $115,250
2001 2.1 $37,900
2000 78.5 $557,900
1999 468.6 $1,004,673
1998 189.5 $293,712
Totals 1,618.8 $8,652,710

Highlighted State Programs

Tennessee Heritage Conservation Trust Fund

In September 2005, the Tennessee Heritage Conservation Trust Fund Act was signed into law. The Fund provides a mechanism for the state to work with other public and private partners for the preservation and protection of priority tracts across Tennessee. The fund will also be used to promote tourism and outdoor recreational activities such as hiking, hunting and fishing.* The Governor has appointed an 11-member board to lead this effort. The legislation establishes this board to raise funds and accept donations for land conservation through a 501(c)(3). Acquisitions are funded through private donations and general fund appropriations. The Governor allocated $10 million to begin the fund, and allocated another $10 million in the FY06/07 budget. The first acquisition from this fund was in 2006.

YearAcresDollars
2013 0.0 $500,000
2012 985.5 $560,000
2010 290.3 $306,000
2009 6,302.0 $8,777,344
2008 1,861.4 $7,868,636
2007 3,423.0 $5,792,981
2006 2,997.0 $6,660,000
Total15,859.2 $30,464,961

Tennessee Wetlands Acquisition Fund

The Wetlands Acquisition Fund (WAF) was the first of the current trust funds established by the General Assembly in 1986.** The WAF provides for the acquisition of wetlands and watershed areas. The program is administered by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. It is funded by appropriations from the real estate transfer tax at a rate of $.0325 per $100, though in the initial legislation the rate was $.04 per $100. Eligible uses of appropriated funds include land acquisition, maintenance of acquired land, and specific support costs.

YearAcresDollars
2013 1,796.4 $1,776,531
2012 4.4 $342,414
2011 698.9 $868,056
2010 113.5 $127,104
2009 1,129.6 $3,347,291
2008 1,422.7 $3,085,534
2007 4,343.6 $7,165,615
2006 1,032.5 $3,000,823
2005 1,943.2 $3,655,850
2004 20.0 $79,575
2003 75,749.5 $6,997,579
2002 515.9 $4,530,886
2001 4,432.3 $10,961,814
2000 1,897.8 $3,102,724
1999 4,255.8 $4,531,764
1998 1,363.0 $2,140,335
Total100,719.1 $55,713,900

Tennessee Local Parks and Recreation Fund

In 1991, the Tennessee General Assembly chose to amend the transfer tax legislation by doubling the transfer tax dedicated to conservation to $.08 cents in order to create three more conservation funds. One of these funds was the Local Parks and Recreation Fund (LPRF), which is apportioned $.0175 of the real estate transfer tax. The purpose of the fund is to provide money for the acquisition of land for parks, natural areas, greenways, trails, archaeological sites, and for the purchase of land for recreation facilities. Funds can also be used for trail development and capital projects. This fund requires a 50 percent match from local governments, but allows them to match fund dollars with land, volunteer services, material, or equipment used for project development. Since its inception over 70 counties and over 90 municipalities have provided matching dollars for land acquisition.

YearAcresDollars
2013 3.2 $250,000
2011 116.0 $298,320
2010 0.0 $11,500
2009 10.2 $960,400
2008 0.0 $200,000
2007 0.0 $1,180,000
2006 0.0 $114,000
2004 0.0 $774,000
2003 0.0 $280,700
2002 0.0 $115,250
2001 0.0 $37,900
2000 0.0 $557,900
1999 0.0 $1,004,673
1998 0.0 $293,712
Total129.4 $6,078,355

Tennessee State Lands Acquisition Fund

Established as part of the 1991 transfer tax legislation, the State Lands Acquisition Fund (SLAF) is allocated $0.150 of the real estate transfer tax. The fund also receives revenue from specialty natural areas license plates sold by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Funds are provided for the acquisition of land or easements for state parks, state forests, state natural areas, boundary areas along state scenic rivers, state trail systems, and for trail development.*** In 2000, the legislation for this fund was amended to include historic sites.

* “Bredesen Signs Conservation Trust Fund Act”, Press Release, September 15, 2005
**Public Chapter 833 (Tennessee Code Title 11, Chapter 14)
*** “Real Estate Transfer Tax: An Overview” by Marty Marina

YearAcresDollars
2013 270.2 $2,911,201
2012 7,605.0 $12,749,587
2011 3,033.2 $3,854,015
2010 2,956.2 $4,344,323
2009 8,287.4 $11,318,694
2008 6,422.4 $12,758,323
2007 4,337.9 $9,281,698
2006 4,094.6 $3,694,596
2005 5,248.3 $4,059,111
2004 138.4 $1,485,542
2003 242.4 $977,415
2002 925.6 $1,981,712
2001 2,896.6 $5,462,451
2000 366.1 $480,261
1999 4,088.4 $2,941,003
1998 4,027.9 $2,422,571
Total54,940.7 $80,722,510

State Policy Framework

Substantial State Investment

Enable Local Financing

State Incentive for Local Land Conservation

Public-Private Partnerships

Conservation Tax Credits

Federal Partnerships

Some data was not provided on a yearly basis, but rather as an aggregate figure. In this case we have distributed total acres acquired and/or dollars spent evenly by year.