Conservation Almanac

Almanac

:

Alaska

Alaska Profile of State Programs and Policy Framework

Highlighted Local Programs

Alaska

Highlighted State Programs

Alaska

State Policy Framework

Alaska

Disclaimer

To avoid double counting acres where multiple programs contributed to the acquisition of a single parcel, the acreage is only aggregated under the program that provided the majority of funding. For example, if the table below displays a dollar amount greater than $0 for a given year but shows 0 acres, the program was not the primary contributor for any parcels in that year. As a result, a prolific program may show very low acreage figures on this page. To see customized program information please visit the map viewer tab or contact the Conservation Almanac Team.

Highlighted Local Programs

No county-level conservation finance measures have been approved by voters in Alaska. For more information on municipal measures in the state, see LandVote.org

Highlighted State Programs

Alaska Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Restoration and Habitat Protection Program

As a result of the 1989 oil spill in Prince William Sound, Exxon agreed to a $900 million civil settlement with annual payments stretched over a ten year period from 1991 to 2001. The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Council consists of three state and three federal trustees, and was formed to allocate funds from the settlement. They dedicated nearly 60 percent of the available settlement funds for habitat protection in the spill region. The Exxon Valdez Habitat Protection program began protecting land in 1993 through its large parcel and small parcel programs. Since 1998, the Council has refocused its efforts away from land acquisition for habitat protection and towards research and monitoring of habitat, although the Council did create an endowment for ongoing acquisitions. Now the program focuses on acquisitions of large parcels over 1,000 acres in size, which support key habitats injured by the spill and small parcels located on coves, along stretches of rivers adjacent to valuable tidelands, and close to spill-area communities. There were no acquisitions between 2006 and 2008.

YearAcresDollars
2015 87.1 $535,000
2014 2,687.2 $6,387,000
2013 88.0 $61,600
2012 1,003.0 $554,510
2011 148.3 $375,000
2010 205.0 $487,000
2009 3.0 $629,000
2005 107.9 $170,000
2003 1,940.0 $2,475,000
2002 43,147.3 $73,608,110
2001 148,389.0 $43,799,769
2000 1,219.8 $2,476,133
1999 64,700.4 $51,114,337
1998 990.3 $2,512,433
Total264,716.2 $185,184,892

State Policy Framework

Substantial State Investment

Enable Local Financing

State Incentive for Local Land Conservation

Public-Private Partnerships

Conservation Tax Credits

Federal Partnerships

Some data was not provided on a yearly basis, but rather as an aggregate figure. In this case we have distributed total acres acquired and/or dollars spent evenly by year.